Recommended Reading and Research Resources: To competently prepare for classroom and research assignments, students should make use of the following publications and resources, available in the library or on-line:


I. Primary Sources: Defined as original material including constitutions/basic law, government documents, speeches or policy papers delivered by government officials, bureaucrats, or political challengers, non-governmental organizations, etc. Students should familiarize themselves with various international organizations, especially those that focus on developing nations, including the United Nations, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), IMF, World Bank, National Endowment for Democracy, International Development Foundation, World Mercy Fund, Global Service Corps, International Food Policy Research Institute, Association on Third World Affairs, Academy for Educational Development, and Peace Corps, to name but a few.

II. Secondary Sources: Defined as reporting, analysis, or commentary, whether scholarly or popular press, by media or academics.

A. Scholarly/Academic journals, including International Affairs, Third World Quarterly, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, The World Today, the World Economy, The National Interest, Orbis, Parliamentary Affairs, Current History, Government and Opposition Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Political Studies, SAIS Review, Contemporary Review, World Policy Journal.

Journals Useful for Military/Military Assessment

Aviation Week and Space Technology
Armed Forces Journal
International Defense Review and Interavia
NATO Review
Scientific American
Survival
Soldat und Technik
U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings

B. Reference Annuals and Key Websites:

Political Handbook of the World
The Statesman’s Yearbook
Freedom House Freedom in the World and Nations in Transit
The World Bank, Global Economic Prospects and Developing Countries.
The World Bank, World Development Report
Pew Research Center, http://pewresearch.org
International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), The Military Balance
Library of Congress, Global Gateway, http://international.loc.gov/intldl/intldlhome.html
Library of Congress, Federal Research Division, http://www.loc.gov/rr/frd/
CIA World Factbook www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook
U.S. State Department Background Notes: www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/
Global Museum on Communism: http://www.globalmuseumoncommunism.org/
Political Resources on the Net, www.politicalresources.net/
Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy: www.islam-democracy.org/
Democracy and Governance: www.usaid.gov/democracy/index.html
Foreign Government Resources on the Web <www.lib.umich.edu/govdocs/foreign.html>
United Nations Development Programme: www.undp.org/
Vanderbilt University Library Resource Page: http://www.library.vanderbilt.edu/romans/polsci/compinte.html
Election Guide: http://www.electionguide.org/index.php

Reporters Without Borders: http://www.rsf.org/
Committee to Protect Journalists: http://cpj.org
The Boroumand Foundation: http://www.abfiran.org/english/foundation.php

Media: newspapers, opinion magazines, etc. including
1. American: The New York Times, Washington Post, Washington Times, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, Commentary, the Progressive, Tikkun, The American Prospect, The New Republic, National Review, Weekly Standard, etc

2. European: The Economist, BBC, New Statesman, International Herald Tribune, The Times, Financial Times, The Guardian, Le Monde, L’Express, Le Point, Le Nouvel Observateur, Der Spiegel, Die Zeit, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

3. East and Central Asia: Asia Times, South China Morning Post, Malaysia-Kini, The Times of India, Indonesia Business Center Online, The Central News Agency (Taiwan), Xinhua News Agency (PRC), Bangkok Post, Far Eastern Economic Review, Nation (Thailand), Hong Kong Standard), Japan Times, Mainichi Newspaper, Korea Web Weekly.

4. Middle East: Arab News [Saudi Arabia], Ha-aretz English [Israel], Al-Jazeera English, Daily Star [Lebanon].

5. African: The Namibian African Perspective, Africa Confidential, Arusha Times, Daily Kenyan, The East African, Ethiopian Review, Ethiopian Commentator, The Monitor [Uganda], Nigerian Tribune, The Star [Johannesburg], The Mail and Guardian [Johannesburg], Express Online [Tanzania], Sudan Tribune, East African Standard, and see the excellent collection of links at http://www.world-newspapers.com/africa.html

6. Latin America: Latin America Press, Mercopress, Prensa Latina, Latin American Post, Hispanic Online







ESSAY ASSIGNMENTS: GRADING RUBRIC


Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.
William J. Strunk, Jr.
The Elements of Style (1918)

FORM

All essays must be typed, double-spaced, with standard margins, on 8 ½” x 11” white paper. All citations must follow the format recommended by Kate Turabian or The Chicago Manual of Style.

CRITERIA

Superior (Grade: A)
  • Addresses a well-defined, significant, thoughtfully selected topic or question.
  • Addresses the question fully and explores the issues thoughtfully.
  • Shows substantial depth, fullness, and complexity of thought. Goes beyond the obvious. Offers illuminating insights.
  • Demonstrates clear, focused, unified, and coherent organization.
  • Is fully developed and detailed.
  • Evidences superior control of diction, syntactic variety, and transition. May have a few minor flaws.
  • Flawless footnotes.

Strong (Grade: B)
  • Addresses a well-defined, significant topic or question.
  • Clearly addresses the question and explores the issues.
  • Shows some depth and complexity of thought. Demonstrates recognition of important ideas.
  • Is effectively organized.
  • Is well-developed, with supporting detail and good citation technique.
  • Demonstrates control of diction, syntactic variety, and transition. May have a few flaws.

Competent (Grade: C)
  • Addresses a clearly defined topic or question.
  • Adequately addresses the question and explores the issues.
  • Shows clarity of thought but may lack complexity. May tend to rely on the obvious and the cliché.
  • Is organized.
  • Is adequately developed, with some detail.
  • Demonstrates competent writing. May have some flaws.
  • Minor flaws in footnotes.

Weak (Grade: D)
  • Addresses an ill-defined or ill chosen topic or question.
  • May distort or neglect parts of the question.
  • May be simplistic or stereotyped in thought. May be essentially uninformative.
  • May demonstrate problems in organization. May be aimless.
  • May have generalizations without supporting detail or detail without generalizations. May be undeveloped.
  • May show patterns of flaws in language, syntax, mechanics, and citation.

Incompetent (Grade: F)

  • Failed attempts to begin discussing the topic.
  • Deliberately off-topic papers. Failure to understand the topic.
  • Papers so incompletely developed as to suggest or demonstrate incompetence.
  • Papers wholly incompetent mechanically.
  • Seriously flawed or absent footnotes.





Azusa Pacific University Spring 2013
Dept. of History and Political Science Prof. Palm

POLI 385: Developing
Political Systems

Roundtable Discussions:
March 5, Indonesia: Fugate, Garcia
March 5, South Africa: Morgan,
March 7, Mexico: Lewandowski,
March 14, Nigeria: Tucker
March 19, Iraq Jones, Gaddini, Winston
March 21, India: Madrigal,
March 21, China: Patton, Torkelson
April 2, Guatemala: Zarghami, Salazar, Morgan, Rao, Sider
April 4, South Korea: Loving, Matza, Kohatsu, Schneider
April 9, Pakistan: Ardill, Duvauchelle, Manhard, Johnson

Assignment: Using your text chapter as background, and several primary and secondary sources, each group member will prepare a ten-minute briefing on a current social or political problem in your assigned country, coordinating with your group to avoid duplication, and including at least one concept discussed in that country’s text chapter. Your presentation may be simply informative, or may conclude with a policy recommendation.

In preparation for your roundtable, begin by learning all you can about your country’s current situation--problems as well as opportunities and progress made--using sources listed in your syllabus, and deciding with your colleagues which you will consider. Prepare an argument about the issue that you can make coherently and persuasively in no more than ten minutes per speaker. It’s essential that you familiarize yourself with the relevant text chapter on your country, and educate the class on the essential terms and concepts relevant to its political development identified therein.
Prepare a single page of bullet points from which you can speak during your presentation, with a bibliography listing your five most important resources (on back if needs be). You are expected to use the Burnell text chapter, and to collect at least five additional primary or secondary sources (some of each is recommended). Consult the syllabus list of news and academic resources available online. Be sure to learn correct pronunciation of foreign names and terms, and to plan with your fellow panel members, knowing in advance who is taking what position or what they’ll address. After each member of the panel has spoken, there will be time for the panel members to question one another if they choose, and for the class to pose questions to you.
Making your Roundtable a Success:
  1. Text: Read the text chapter on your country and identify with your group the problems and ideas presented there, and research where things stand with them more recently. You may be certain that if your group doesn’t address the issues raised in the text chapter your professor will ask you to do so in Q/A.
  2. Coordinate with your RT colleagues periodically as you prepare, and make sure everyone has something current and interesting to speak about.
  3. Avoid Generalizing: Don’t let one person in your group volunteer to explain the past history of the country or its general statistics. Each person should have one aspect of the country’s current situation to address—for example, political parties and current positions, economic condition and policies, a particular health problem, demographic trends and issues, clean water, land use and environmental issues, crime, corruption, religious conflict, security problems, human rights issues, etc.
  4. Statistics: Any stats used in any presentation should include an explanation to the audience a) why they are the most recent you could find, and b) why significant.
  5. Relevance: Everything discussed should relate to the country’s government or politics (what is the government doing or not doing? What policies does a particular candidate or party propose and why?), and the information you provide recent—use reliable news and analysis sources to give your presentation currency alongside other material, including the relevant text chapter, to give it depth.

Along with your text chapter, a great place to start your research is The Economist website or magazine.

The Paper: Your paper should be 1000 words, +/- 25 words, with approximately one half of the paper summarizing the situation as it stands, and the second half solutions, and assessing where things might be headed. Your paper is due the date of your Roundtable Presentation. Papers submitted after class will be considered one day late. Footnotes done following Chicago Manual of Style/Turabian are required, and you should include references cited with footnotes to recent events, developments and trends that are relevant. Include on a separate page at the end of your paper a Bibliography of news and other sources consulted. Most should be sources from the past 24 months. The grade you receive on this short assignment will be based on quality and clarity of writing, the depth of your analysis, and the quality of sources consulted.

Presentation: Your ppt presentation should at least include a map or maps of the country and region. Also useful but not required are:
  • Statistics or charts, w/ source and date on screen.
  • Quoted material from important figures involved, or notable observers, in quotation marks w/ date and source on screen.
  • Relevant news video, again w/ date and source, or video interview that you have done with someone knowledgeable on the issue.

No text (other than quotations) or bullet points should appear on the screen: maps, charts, statistics, quotations, or video only.

On the day of your Roundtable, don’t plan on reading your paper to us; use bullet points or note cards from which you can speak during your presentation. Familiarize yourself with the correct pronunciation of foreign names and terms. After each member of the panel has spoken, there will be time for the panel members to question one another if they choose, and for the class to pose questions to you. It’s not necessary for the panel to be in agreement. Typically students on a panel find several points on which they do and don’t agree, and this makes it more interesting. It is essential that you are familiar with the latest developments on your country/issue.

For this assignment you’ll receive a score on your written paper; the quality of your class presentation will be included as part of your class participation grade. Primary criteria include the following:

  • General comprehension of the topic;
  • Quality of sources consulted (demonstrate familiarity with primary and secondary sources, and properly cited);
  • Arguments clearly stated and comprehensible, foreign names pronounced capably.
  • Logic/orderliness of presentation


  • International Relations Prof. Palm, Spring 2014

  • Roundtable Discussion and Paper, Instructions and Schedule

  • Roundtable Panel Presentations: Class during weeks 3 – 8 will include in-class discussions during which students will work in a small group, individually writing a short essay of 1000 words (+/- 25) on a topic of current interest as assigned. Each student will summarize a specific situation and trends in about five minutes, including policy recommendations if desired.

  • Required for this assignment on the day of your presentation is your 1000-word essay. Roundtable Groups will meet briefly during the first few weeks of class, and later, as needed. Following individual presentations, panel members may question each other if they choose, and the class will be required to pose at least three questions to the panel.

  • Background: Roundtable panel discussions are a typical forum at professional academic conferences. Unlike panels in which prepared scholarly papers are presented and discussed, roundtables allow a similar number of scholars to share information or perspectives on the topic, followed by time for informal interaction among themselves and their audience.

  • The Paper: Make your paper 1000 words, +/- 25 words, with approximately one half of the paper summarizing some aspect of the situation as it stands, and the second half assessing where things might be headed, including (if you wish) your policy recommendations for specific people (President, U.S. Secretary of Defense, Sec. of State, other nations’ heads of state, etc.) who might influence events. If you’re writing about U.S. foreign policy, keep in mind its three foundational elements — national interest, political principle, and prudence, as discussed in class. Your paper is due the date of your Roundtable Presentation. Papers submitted after class will be considered late. Footnotes done following Chicago Manual of Style/Turabian are required, and you should include references cited with footnotes to recent events, developments and trends that are relevant. Look for a good mix of primary and secondary sources as described in the course syllabus. Include on a separate page at the end of your paper a bibliography of news and other sources consulted. Most should be sources from the past 24 months. The grade you receive on this short assignment will be based on quality and clarity of writing, the quality of your analysis, and the quality of sources consulted. See the rubric in the course syllabus for details.

  • Ppt Presentation: Your presentation should include a map or maps of the country and region, it should have a clear, simple point, and have clearly presented facts that your classmates can absorb and note. Your best points and facts may be used as questions on the Midterm and Final, so avoid information overload. Please abide by a 50-word total limit on screen, including quotations. Also useful, but not required are:
    • Statistics or charts, w/ source and date on screen.
    • A quotation or two from important figures involved, or notable observers, in quotation marks w/ date and source on screen.
    • Brief and relevant news video, again w/ date and source, or video interview that you have done with someone knowledgeable on the issue.

  • On the day of your Roundtable, don’t plan on reading your paper to the class; use note cards or a page of bullet points from which you can speak during your presentation. Familiarize yourself with the correct pronunciation of foreign names and terms. After each member of the panel has spoken, there will be time for the panel members to question one another if they choose, and for the class to pose questions to you. It’s not necessary for the panel to be in agreement on a particular policy. Typically students on a panel find several points on which they do and don’t agree, and this makes it more interesting. It is essential that you are familiar with the latest developments on your country/issue.

  • Aim to make your oral presentation as professional as possible. Have a clear point that you want to make, support it well, and avoid unprofessional and vague slang adjectives (e.g., random, lame, bogus, sketchy, etc.).

  • For this assignment you’ll receive a score on your written paper; the quality of your class presentation will be included as part of your class participation grade. Primary criteria include the following:
    • General comprehension of the topic;
    • Quality of sources consulted (demonstrate familiarity with primary and secondary sources, and properly cited);
    • Arguments clearly stated and comprehensible, foreign names pronounced capably.
    • Logic/orderliness of presentation
  • All papers will be graded and returned near the end of the semester, when all have been turned in.
  • International Relations Roundtable Presentations Schedule
  • Unless otherwise noted, presentations will be scheduled on Wednesdays.
  • RT 1: Russian Relations w/ “Near Abroad” Neighbors, 2014: Andaya, Hunt, Withers, Power
  • RT 2: Afghanistan Status, 2014: Rocha, Freed, Johnson, Ludwig
  • RT 3: Egypt’s 2014 Crisis and Foreign Relations: Castillo-Rodriguez, H. Park, Laggren, Watson
  • RT 4: The Syrian Crisis and Syria’s Neighbor Countries, 2014:, Jones, Madsen, Rodriguez, Mr. W. Park
  • RT 5: Case Studies in Successful Economic Development, 2014: Marquecho, A. Garcia, Seo, Mikail, Taboada
  • RT 6: U.S. Policy Options for a Nuclear Iran, 2014: Garcia, Haros
  • RT 7: IR and the Korean Peninsula, 2014: Al Darei, Gomez, Orozco, Small



Term Paper Assignment




Final Drafts due in class: Wednesday, April 16, 2014 [last class before Easter]

“Broadly speaking, the short words are the best, and the old words best of all. --Winston Churchill

Write a 2000-word (+/- 50 words, not including title page, bibliography, or footnotes) paper, typed, double spaced, on one of the following topics:



  • International relations and al Qaeda and affiliates in Northern Africa, 2012-2014
  • Turkey’s international relations, 2012-14
  • Natural gas and international relations, 2012-14
  • International relations and the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands dispute, 2012-14
  • Cyber-security and international defensive measures, 2012-14



Your paper should include a general discussion of the recent course of events and consideration of major nations involved, the national interests of nations involved, and political or religious aspects that enter into the equation. Also include a section on U.S. foreign policy perspectives on the issue—what is the Obama administration’s and/or Republican opposition’s stated policy on the issue?



Your paper is only considered “turned in” when your stapled paper copy has been received by the instructor in person or date-stamped by Dept. Staff and placed in his mailbox. Prof. Palm will not print and grade your emailed final draft.



Papers must be focused, cite reputable sources consulted w/ Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style footnotes, and must have in the opening paragraph/s a clearly identifiable thesis statement. Your paper may briefly (1-2 pages) summarize the past history of the issue, but should be describing recent events by the top of your third page, and continuing through the paper to offer analysis of the various sides’ arguments as conveyed in government position papers, statements, speeches, and analyzed by academic and professional resources. The paper may conclude with policy recommendations for resolving the conflict, using appropriate measures (military, diplomatic, economic).



All sources in your footnotes and bibliography should include the date of publication. For websites, include date of publication as well as the date you accessed it.



Thesis statement: Your first or second paragraph must include a clear thesis statement or question and may include the words, “This paper will consider . . .” For example: “This paper will consider the debate about current U.S. policy in Afghanistan, and assess the various participants’ recommendations.” A thesis statement must be sufficiently narrow to allow for a paper of significant depth.

Opinion: Students often ask if they are permitted to add their opinion to the paper. Short answer: Mere opinion, no. Informed, logically deduced conclusions, yes. For this assignment, consider the entire paper 1) an explanation of the facts that concern your thesis, and 2) proof or fulfillment of your thesis statement. Avoid horrible phrases like, “My personal opinion is . . ., I feel that . . .” In fact, the personal pronoun “I” should appear nowhere in your paper (unless, of course, you are quoting someone else). Set forth the facts as you have researched them, and let your paper serve as support for your thesis statement. In other words, you’re not writing a personal opinion paper here; you have researched the topic and know something about it, and you are now explaining it to your readers, or persuading them about a policy direction that should be taken. Uninformed opinion has nothing to do with this assignment.



Sources: It is expected that you will do substantial reading in researching this paper. A strong paper for this assignment will have the following:



  1. At least three primary sources, including any of the following: references to relevant portions of the constitution of your country, published laws, published speeches, policy papers or other documents, or published interviews with government officials, bureaucrats, or candidates for office from the countries you are covering, or even an interview you have done yourself with a bona fide candidate or government official from the country. On the web, anything w/ a “dot gov” ending is good. (Note that a news article that includes a few quotations from a government agency or representative is not a primary source.)
  2. At least three recent reputable secondary sources: Scholarly and professional journal articles (e.g. Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Orbis, U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings, etc.) are best, but newspaper articles, and other library/internet resources, including online periodicals are useful. Interviews (in person, telephone or on-line) with people from the region or countries you are researching, or Americans who live in the U.S. but retain ties with their country of origin can be quite valuable, especially if they have direct connections with government or military. Published books may well be useful for background, of course, and those very recently published may be important to include if available. The latter will usually be harder to come by, but it may well be worthwhile to spend some time looking online and accessing them by Link + or electronically.

    The instructor will be reading your paper noting the quality of your sources, and the ways in which you utilize them in support of your thesis.

    Encyclopedias (including wikipedia.com) and the course textbook may be useful for your initial background research, but are not to be used as a resource when writing your paper.[1] In college writing, with rare exceptions, none of your footnotes should refer to the text or an encyclopedia. We assume that you will use such sources for introductory research only, moving on to other sources to produce an original work of some depth. Except for a few short quotations, the entirety of your paper should be original material that you have written. Do not attach to your paper printed or photocopied pages from other sources. One or two charts, graphs, maps that you have produced yourself (not downloaded) are allowable.

As a rule of thumb, a well-written research paper will likely have two or three paragraphs, and two to six footnotes, per page.

Late Policy: Late papers will be accepted, but penalized one letter grade per calendar day.

Return of Graded Papers: I’ll make every effort to have your papers graded by the date of the final exam. If this isn’t possible, you may, of course, pick up your papers from the Department Secretary next semester in Ronald 130.

Notes On Writing Term Papers


Writing: Everything in your paper should be expressed and argued in standard English, and grammatically correct prose, avoiding slang and informal expressions. Take a few minutes to review basic grammar before writing. Remind yourself of the definitions of a sentence and a paragraph.

Spelling: Prof. Palm does not believe in the existence of the “typo,” and holds to the view that correct spelling is one mark of an educated and careful person. He believes that there are no excuses for spelling errors in college writing (especially in an age of computer spell-check tools!). Always use a computer spell-check function and have a reliable friend or classmate proofread. More than one or two spelling errors in your paper will likely result in a grade drop.

Style:

  • Write clearly. Avoid jargon of all types. Use words that are in the dictionary and have stood the test of time.
  • Write with dignity. Make sure that your arguments are firmly grounded in facts. “Given x and y, the outlook for the near future is z.” Avoid forms of the verb “to be” (is, are, were, etc.). Instead, use strong verbs that show action.
  • Write with confidence. If you are to argue a point in a paper, think through your argument, and then make your case. Avoid using the first person (e.g. I believe that . . .); avoid using “seem” (e.g. Harlan seems to be saying . . . ) and avoid the verb “feel.” Such expressions make your writing far less forceful and convincing. Instead, prefer verbs like “contend” or “argue.” (Instead of “President Obama felt that . . .” write “President Obama argued that . . .”).

Format: With respect to the physical appearance of your paper, simplicity is a virtue. Papers must be typed, double-spaced, pages numbered, and should be held together with nothing more than a single staple in the upper left-hand corner. No plastic/ cardboard binding is necessary. Do include a cover page as produced at the end of this document, followed by your first page of text.

Font: Use Times New Roman, 12 pt. No other fonts or sizes are acceptable.

Quotation: Resist the urge to fill your paper with long quotations. Use a few direct quotations well and wisely, and be sure to introduce those quotes you do use, and of course you will use quotation marks at beginning and end. In a paper of this short length, it is unlikely that you would have a quote longer than five lines of text, but if you do, indent the quote an inch on each side, single space, justify, and do not use quotation marks. This is referred to as a “block quote.”

Bibliography: Include a bibliography at the end of your paper, to indicate all the sources you consulted for this paper, whether or not you cited them in specific footnotes. Arrange your Bibliography page like this:



Bibliography



Primary Sources

Interview with President Obama on Colombia-U.S. Trade Deal, BBC News, Jan. 14, 2012, http://www.bbcnews.com 1/14/09/ [accessed Nov. 15, 2013].

“Economic Relations”, Embassy of Colombia website http://www.colombia.org/index/php?option-com.content=210 [accessed Nov. 15, 2013].

Etc.

Secondary Sources

McDermott, Jeremy. “Colombia’s Rocky Regional Relations” New York Times, July 20, 2009 http://www.nyt.com/index/colombia/option-con/americas/81745343.stm [accessed Nov. 20, 2009].

Kissinger, Henry. “China’s Future Foreign Policy” Foreign Affairs, Aug. 1, 2013. http://www.foreignaffairs.com/index/china-kissinger2013 [accessed April 14, 2014].

Etc.



Footnotes: MS Word and most other word processing programs include “References” and “Insert Footnote” commands that makes the whole process quite simple. Remember that the proper order of punctuation, when footnoting a quote at the end of a sentence, is as follows: period, quotation mark, footnote #. For example:



As Abraham Lincoln said in his address at Gettysburg, this nation was “conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”[2]



Examples for your footnotes are to be found at the Chicago Manual of Style Quick Guide website.



For citations to the same source immediately following and on the same page, use Ibid., an abbreviation of the Latin ibidem, “the same.” Note that Ibid. is not all caps, and, as an abbreviation, it needs a period at the end.



2 Ibid., 404.



Remember that Ibid. can never be the first footnote on a page.



Footnotes should be single-spaced at the bottom of the page. Use Times New Roman 10 pt.









Term Paper Checklist



Before turning your paper in, go through the following checklist of common mistakes.

Ö Have you read your own paper aloud, and had a person of outstanding moral character give your paper a final proofread? If not, do so.

Ö Do a word search for the following words or phrases: being, bias, feel, stance, fixate, lame, sketchy, mindset, basically, irregardless (use “regardless”), “in regards to” (use “respecting”), and “people group” (“population” or simply “people” will do nicely). Delete or change and rewrite the sentence.

Ö Did you use any of the following homonyms? If so, check a dictionary: lead/led, boarder/border, its/it’s, cite/site/sight, they’re/there/their.

Ö Did you write about your personal feelings? If so, delete and rewrite making an argument that refers to evidence or uses logical argument.

Ö Cover page: Produce a cover page like that below.

Ö Bibliography: Be sure your Bibliography page follows the formatting described above, distinguishing primary and secondary sources.

Ö Check your footnotes: Did you indent the first line of each footnote using the MS Word ruler? Is the author’s first name first and last name last? Correct if necessary.

Ö Respecting footnote numbers appearing in the text of your paper: are they at the very end of each sentence, after the period or quotation marks? They should be. Correct if necessary.

Ö Word Count: Do not include bibliography, footnotes, or cover page in your word count. To eliminate footnotes from your word count, simply click on “Words” in the bottom left corner of your MS Word screen, and check the box.

Ö Did you skip an extra line between paragraphs? Don’t.

Ö Is each and every apostrophe properly placed?

Ö Are any of your paragraphs longer than one page? They probably shouldn’t be.

Ö Is there a page number on your cover page? Get rid of it—cover pages don’t need one.

Ö Is your staple straight? If not, re-staple.






FORM AND CRITERIA For ESSAY ASSIGNMENTS



Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.

William J. Strunk, Jr.,The Elements of Style (1918)



FORM


All essays must be typed, double-spaced, with standard margins, on 8 ½” x 11” white paper. All citations must follow the format recommended by Kate Turabian or The Chicago Manual of Style.



CRITERIA




Superior (Grade: A)

  • Addresses a well-defined, significant, thoughtfully selected topic or question.
  • Addresses the question fully, explores the issues thoughtfully, using a variety of excellent resources.
  • Shows substantial depth, fullness, and complexity of thought. Goes beyond the obvious. Offers illuminating insights.
  • Demonstrates clear, focused, unified, and coherent organization.
  • Is fully developed and detailed.
  • Evidences superior control of diction, syntactic variety, and transition. May have a few minor flaws.
  • Flawless footnotes.



Strong (Grade: B)

  • Addresses a well-defined, significant topic or question.
  • Clearly addresses the question and explores the issues, using mostly good resources.
  • Shows some depth and complexity of thought. Demonstrates recognition of important ideas.
  • Is effectively organized.
  • Is well-developed, with supporting detail and good citation technique.
  • Demonstrates control of diction, syntactic variety, and transition. May have a few flaws.



Competent (Grade: C)

  • Addresses a clearly defined topic or question.
  • Adequately addresses the question and explores the issues, utilizing some good resources.
  • Shows clarity of thought but may lack complexity. May tend to rely on the obvious and the cliché.
  • Is organized.
  • Is adequately developed, with some detail.
  • Demonstrates competent writing. May have some flaws.
  • Minor flaws in footnotes.



Weak (Grade: D)

  • Addresses an ill-defined or ill-chosen topic or question.
  • May distort or neglect parts of the question, using too few good resources.
  • May be simplistic or stereotyped in thought. May be essentially uninformative.
  • May demonstrate problems in organization. May be aimless.
  • May have generalizations without supporting detail or detail without generalizations. May be undeveloped.
  • May show patterns of flaws in language, syntax, mechanics, and citation.



Incompetent (Grade: F)


  • Failed attempts to begin discussing the topic, utilizing few to no good resources.
  • Deliberately off-topic papers. Failure to understand the topic.
  • Papers so incompletely developed as to suggest or demonstrate incompetence.
  • Papers wholly incompetent mechanically.
  • Seriously flawed or absent footnotes.





Print this statement and sign, after your bibliography. A separate page is not necessary.







“I certify that all material presented in this assignment is my own work except where I have clearly acknowledged the work of others by means of accurate citation. I have read and understand the University’s Academic Integrity Policy.”





Signed: _ Date:___



[1] Middlebury College in Vermont has established a similar policy: “Wikipedia is not an acceptable citation, even though it may lead one to a citable source.”
[2] Abraham Lincoln, “Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg,” November 19, 1863, in Stanley Appelbaum, ed., Great Speeches: Abraham Lincoln (New York: Dover Thrift Editions, 1991), 103.